ECONOMICS 101 College offers students $10G bachelor’s program

 

Experts estimate the average college graduate will leave school after four years carrying more than $30,000 in debt, a figure that prompted Southern New Hampshire University to offer a much different price point- a $10,000 Bachelor of Arts degree through the school’s new College for America.

The program, created as a partnership with employers, is designed specifically for working people, with real life experience who, for one reason or another, never got a college degree. The curriculum is competency based, self-paced and student work is submitted largely online.

“One thing we know that can move people from their socio-economic position to something better is an education and that’s the goal. We’re trying to get more Americans across that finish line,” said Paul LeBlanc, President of SNHU. “The hurdles for many people are that they have incredibly busy lives- so they’re juggling work and family and kids and soccer practice and church and whatever else that sort of informs their calendar.”

Some 70 corporate partners nationwide have signed on since the program launched in October of last year and 1,000 students have enrolled.

“I immediately thought it was brilliant,” said Lisa Guertin, president of Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New Hampshire. She says her company jumped at the chance to join the pilot program.

Instead of traditional lectures and course work, College for America aims to ensure a student can complete certain tasks and master skills related to key areas needed in the working world.

“An employer knows that when someone finishes the degree they will have demonstrated mastery in 120 very specific areas that are immediately applied to the job,” said Guertin. “So in terms of a corporate return on investment, I feel like it’s even stronger than just paying for general college courses, which we were already doing, so this was a bit of a no-brainer.”

“There are a lot of adults who know things. They don’t need to sit through sixteen weeks of college math if they’ve been the book keeper in their family company or if they’ve been doing this work for a long time,” said LeBlanc. “Our notion is let’s get you credit for what you know and let’s find you speedy ways for you to demonstrate your competency and move on.”

Darby Conley, a 36-year-old working mom, was among the first to enter the program through Anthem.

“I have three young children. I was pregnant at the time. I was allowed to be as aggressive as I needed to be and I was also able to take some time off to be with my newborn and sometimes it can seem not attainable when you’re looking at a two-year stretch or a four-year stretch,” said Conley who was drawn to the program’s low cost and flexability. “I was in control and I really got to dictate what my experience was going to be like.”

She has already earned her associate’s degree through the College for America and is now working toward her bachelor’s degree, achievements that have gave her a greater sense of confidence.

“Society can make you feel that if you don’t have that degree, if you don’t have that plaque that’s up on your wall, that you’re not worthy and I would say that I took that to heart,” said Conley. “I wouldn’t apply for a job because it would say degree required, bachelor’s required and I would be hesitant because I didn’t have that even though I knew I was strong and I’d proven myself so that checked box has empowered me.”

Molly Line joined Fox News Channel as a Boston-based correspondent in January 2006.

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/08/30/economics-degree-college-offers-10g-bachelor-program/

TEACHING FERGUSON Group’s lesson plan cites Black Panther platform

 

Even though the police shooting of an unarmed man in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is only weeks old and a grand jury is still trying sort out what really happened, a Washington-based nonprofit is offering a classroom lesson plan that draws a link between the incident and the revolutionary rhetoric of the 1960s Black Panther Party.

Teaching for Change says its “Teaching about Ferguson” guide can help students think critically about the shooting of Michael Brown in an Aug. 9 confrontation with police and ways they can be proactive in their own communities.

“The Black Panther Party’s 1966 platform, known as the 10-point program, included the demand: ‘We want an immediate end to police brutality and murder of Black people, other people of color, and all oppressed people inside the United States,’” the group’s Julian Hipkins III wrote.

“The issue of police brutality in communities of color has a long history and the Panther platform gives an example of how to turn grievances into a clear set of goals for meaningful change,” he said. The issue was first reported by education watchdog EAG News.

The shooting of Brown, 18, prompted several nights of angry protests near the spot where he was killed. Local police responded to those protests with tear gas, smoke canisters, and the use of surplus military equipment, including tanks. Some public officials and others called that response heavy-handed. Eventually, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon called in the National Guard to restore order.

Brown was buried Monday after hundreds attended his funeral at the Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church. A St. Louis County grand jury began reviewing evidence last week.

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch said it could take the grand jury until mid-October to hear all evidence.

“As the new school year begins, first and foremost on our minds and in our hearts will be the killing of Michael Brown,” Hipkins wrote. “Teachers may be faced with students’ anger, frustration, sadness, confusion, and questions. Some students will wonder how this could happen in the United States.”

Hipkins said his group’s lesson plan will introduce students to the history of the Black Panther movement and invite them to create their own list of demands. Huey Newton and other Panther leaders created the demands as the basis of the group’s radical, and sometimes violent, philosophy.

Hipkins and Teaching for Change included another topic for discussion in the lesson plan. It involved having students watch a video of Malcolm X accusing the United States of human rights violations against blacks and calling for a United Nations investigation.

“Indeed, the U.S. government is quick to condemn human rights violations in other countries, but does not expect to be accountable to the world for actions within its borders,” he wrote.

The lesson plan’s other areas of discussion include “History of Racism,” “Militarization of the Police” and “Student Fear and Resilience.”

Administrators for the public school system in Washington D.C. took a less controversial approach, distributing new guidance to teachers on how to talk about Ferguson in the classroom.

“While the facts of the case are still being sorted out by those in the criminal justice system, these events are teachable moments in classrooms across the District of Columbia Schools,” the school system said in a five-page teacher’s guide, “Preparing to Discuss Michael Brown in the Classroom.”

“If you are going to discuss the killing of Michael Brown, content questions might be: Who was Michael Brown? Where did he grow up? Why was he in Ferguson? These questions are important, but questions such as Why do you believe the police shot him? And how should communities react to this tragedy? Push students to make connections beyond one news story and lead to a more complex understanding of the situation,” DC Schools said.

While Washington schools weren’t shying away from the shooting, that wasn’t the case in Edwardsville, an Illinois school district 25 miles from Ferguson, . Teachers there were being told to avoid the subject altogether.

Superintended Ed Hightower told KMOX News that if students bring up the shooting in class, teachers have been told to change the subject.

Hightower told the station Ferguson wasn’t open for discussion because the shooting “has become a situation whereby there are so many facts that are unknown.”

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/08/30/ferguson-shooting-spurs-curriculum-advocates-to-craft-lesson-on-race/

DEADLY CRASH Teen dies in ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ Lamborghini drive

lam2b.jpg

Aug. 29: A New York teen taking a test drive of a family friend’s Lamborghini has died after crashing the high-powered sports car into a guardrail.NEWSDAY

A New York teen taking a test drive of a family friend’s Lamborghini has died after crashing the high-powered sports car into a guardrail.

Police say 18-year-old Samuel Shepard was taking the car for a spin on a county road in Mount Sinai on Long Island early Friday when he lost control. The car’s owner, Michael Power, was a passenger in the car and was treated for nonlife-threatening injuries.

Det. Sgt. Michael Fitzharris told Newsday that excessive speed is believed to be a factor in the crash. Police told the paper that the two were heading back to a parking lot.

Of the test drive, Fitzharris said, “I think it was probably just a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the kid, and this man chose to give him this opportunity.”

Shepard’s father, Gene, tells the newspaper that Lamborghinis were his son’s favorite car.

The report said Shepard had recently graduated from high school and hoped to serve in the Army for a few years and become a police officer.

“He knew exactly what he was going to do,” his father told the paper.

Photo by Newsday

The Associated Press contributed to this report 

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/08/30/new-york-teen-dies-taking-lamborghini-for-once-in-lifetime-test-drive/

‘A TOUGH TIME’ Comedian Morgan still struggling after fatal crash

morganinternal1616.jpg

April 9, 2014: Actor Tracy Morgan attends the FX Networks Upfront premiere screening of “Fargo” at the SVA Theater in New York. (AP)

Nearly three months after being involved in an accident that left a fellow comedian dead, Tracy Morgan may be months away from being able to fully walk again.

Benedict P. Morelli, an attorney for the former “Saturday Night Live” star, said Morgan is “really having a tough time” following the six-car June 7 crash that killed comedian James McNair, The Star-Ledger reported. Morgan’s limo bus, in which McNair was traveling, was struck by a Wal-Mart truck.

Morelli said Morgan, who suffered a broken leg, nose and several ribs in the crash, still relies on a wheelchair.

“He’s making incremental progress,” Morelli said. “But they’ll have to wait another month before they assess him cognitively.”

The truck driver has pleaded not guilty to vehicular homicide and assault by auto.

Morgan accused Wal-Mart of negligence in a federal lawsuit.

Click here to read more from The Star-Ledger.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2014/08/30/comedian-tracy-morgan-still-struggling-after-crash/

Box Office: ‘As Above, So Below’ Digs Up $470,000 Thursday Night

James Gunn‘s Guardians of the Galaxy has become the No. 1 film of the year to date at the North American box office, flying by fellow Marvel Studios’ superhero film Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

The quirky tentpole, made by Marvel and Disney, took in an estimated $3.8 million on Friday, pushing its domestic total to $262.1 million (Winter Soldier earned $259.8 million). Globally, it has earned north of $500 million.

Guardians will easily rule the Labor Day holiday despite being in its fifth weekend. The movie has pulled off the biggest surprise in memory with its record-breaking performance, and has helped to shore up the ailing 2014 summer box office, although revenue is still down a whopping 15 percent from last year.

New Labor Day weekend entries The November Man and As Above, So Below are doing only modest business so far, and are likely to come in behind Guardians, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and If I Stay for the four-day holiday weekend.

From Legendary Entertainment, As Above, So Below earned $3.2 million Friday, placing No. 3 Guardians and TMNT. The micro-budgeted found-footage film is hoping for a four-day debut of 11.3 million, but could lose the No. 3 spot to If I Stay.

Costing $5 million to make, the psychological thriller follows a group of explorers that discover dark forces when they dive into the catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

From director Roger Donaldson and starring Pierce Brosnan in a James Bond-like role, The November Man is going after adults and opened Wednesday to get a jump on the action. It’s expected to gross $9.8 million for the four days for a six day debut somewhere in the $11.5 million range. It continues to hold at No. 5.

The $20 million-plus movie, which follows an ex-CIA agent (Pierce Brosnan) who is brought back for one more mission and finds himself pitted against his former pupil, was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners. Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey also star in November Man, which Relativity acquired for $3 million.

Poor reviews could be hurting November Man, although audiences liked it better, giving it a B+ CinemaScore. As Above, So Below earned a withering C- CinemaScore.

Aug. 29, 3:31 p.m. Updated with Friday projections. 

Aug. 30, 7 a.m. Updated with offiical Friday numbers.

 

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/U7PCJA-vnDo/story01.htm

Box Office: Pierce Brosnan’s ‘The November Man’ Opens to Soft No. 5

Roger Donaldson‘s adult-skewing espionage thriller The November Man, starring Pierce Brosnan in a role reminiscent of his James Bond days, opened to a soft $862,000 at the North American box office Wednesday for a fifth-place finish.

It’s true that adults don’t rush out to see a movie on opening night, but November Man had hoped to do more on its first day. The film, independently financed and released by Relativity Media, also stars Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey.

November Man stars Brosnan as an extremely dangerous ex-CIA agent who is lured out of retirement to protect a witness. The assignment makes him the target of his former friend and CIA protege.

Audiences liked November Man better than critics, giving it a B+ CinemaScore.

The film, getting an early jump on the long Labor Day holiday by opening Wednesday, hopes to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut, although it may only end up at $10 million, based on Wednesday’s number.

The $20 million-plus movie was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners, with Relativity acquiring U.S. rights for a reported $3 million.

The holiday’s second new nationwide player is Legendary Entertainment’s microbudgeted As Above, So Below, about a team of explorers who confront their past sins while caught in the twisting catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which begins rolling out Thursday night, per its deal with Legendary. The movie has targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

Labor Day is never a big moviegoing weekend, although this year could be even slower than usual. It’s likely that holdover Guardians of the Galaxy will stay at the No. 1 spot. The Disney and Marvel Studios title topped Wednesday’s chart with an estimated $1.5 million for a domestic total of $256.7 million.

Paramount’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles followed with an estimated $1.1 million for a domestic total of $149.6 million. YA film adaptation If I Stay came in No. 3 with an estimated $1 million for a total of $19.5 million, followed by R-rated comedy Let’s Be Cops with $800,000 for a total $48.3 million.

Despite gains made in August, thanks in large part to Guardians and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, domestic summer revenue is still down down nearly 15 percent from last year, and isn’t likely to get much past $4 billion by the end of Labor Day. That’s the lowest number in eight years.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/1JE9RH9YL5Q/story01.htm

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Crosses $500 Million Globally

Notching another victory, Marvel Studios and Disney’s Guardians of the Galaxy crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office Tuesday, only days after becoming the top film of the summer in North America.

Through Monday, the quirky superhero tentpole has earned $500.5 million, including $255.2 million domestically and $245.3 million internationally, where it has several key markets yet to open, including China, Japan, Germany and Italy.

And in the next few days, Guardians will eclipse Warner Bros. family hit The Lego Movie ($257.7 million) and fellow Marvel title Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($259.8 million) to become the top-grossing film of 2014 to date in North America.

Worldwide, Paramount and Michael Bay‘s Age of Extinction remains the year’s leader by far, with a global gross of $1.065 billion. Guardians ranks No. 10, just behind Godzilla ($508 million), which it will soon overtake.

From director James Gunn, Guardians of the Galaxy has pulled off the biggest box-office surprise of the year. Heading into summer, no one predicted that the movie would emerge the victor in North America. Opening Aug. 1, Guardians, praised for its originality, amazed with a record domestic debut and continued to impress from there.

Featuring a ragtag group of unlikely galactic heroes, Guardians stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee Pace and Bradley Cooper, who voices the role of Rocket Raccoon. Vin Diesel, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro also star.

Guardians wasn’t a cheap proposition and cost $170 million to produce. Marvel and Disney have already announced plans for a July 28, 2017 sequel, with Gunn returning to direct.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/qierRC4Y-BE/story01.htm

Syria’s civil war turns into fight for control of global jihad movement

 

Syria’s bloody civil war has spawned a separate rift with ramifications well beyond the region known as the Levant — a battle for the very soul of the global jihad movement.

Islamic militants who poured into the embattled nation to help the Free Syrian Army in its bid to topple dictator Bashar Assad are now fighting Assad, the rebels and each other in a barbaric free-for-all. At the center is the split between Al Qaeda’s regional affiliate, Jabhat al-Nusra, and the newly emerged Islamic State, which are fighting each other on the battlefield and in the war for recruits to the cause of Islamic terrorism.

“The two groups are now in an open war for supremacy of the global jihadist movement,” according to Middle East scholar Aaron Zelin in a research paper published by the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, a U.S.-based think tank.

Throw in the jihadist-led insurgency in neighboring Iraq, which has become intertwined in the insurrection in Syria, and the shifting alliances are becoming for many even harder to understand.

“The two groups are now in an open war for supremacy of the global jihadist movement.”

- Aaron Zelin, Middle east scholar

Last week, Al-Nusra, struggling to stay relevant and recruit fighters, released a video featuring three of their fighters as they head off in northern Syria near the city of Aleppo to battle the Islamic State, which was disowned by Al Qaeda. The message was that they, not Islamic State, have the purer motives.

“We in the Al Nusra Front only fight to raise the word of Allah, to make the oppressed triumphant,” one fighter says. “We only fight to get rid of the enemy Bashar and his soldiers. We have come to fight them so that we can impose Allah’s laws on the country. We have not come to oppress people, steal from people, or take their property.”

Another fighter urges Islamic State fighters to defect and “return to the truth” by joining Al Nusra, which is aligned with several Islamist rebel militias in Syria and has been fighting against the Islamic State since last winter, when Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri disavowed Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the boss of the upstart group then known as ISIS.

“Al Qaeda announces that it does not link itself with [ISIS] … It is not a branch of the Al Qaeda group, does not have an organizational relationship with it and [Al Qaeda] is not the group responsible for their actions,” the terror network’s General Command declared.

The pointed disavowal sparked mass defections from Al Baghdadi’s burgeoning operation. Jihadist and rebel groups eager to avenge ISIS assassinations of their comrades, took it as a sign it was open season on ISIS.

But Al Baghdadi, whose mentor was Abu Mousab al-Zarqawi, a Jordanian militant who himself was rebuked in 2005 by Al Zawahiri for excessive extremism in Iraq, clawed back. The success Islamic State, as it is now known, has enjoyed since is testament to his leadership skills and strategic savvy of the jihadist veterans from Iraq and Chechnya who are at the core of ISIS. By forming alliances with Sunni tribes along the border and deep into Iraq, Al Baghdadi managed to magnify his power.

Some terror experts believe Al Zawahiri, Usama bin Laden’s successor as Al Qaeda chief, was too slow in identifying Al Baghdadi as a serious rival for leadership of the global jihad movement. Tensions had existed within the jihadist movement in Syria since April 2013, the year before the disavowal, and “core Al Qaeda failed to take a genuinely commanding line,” said Charles Lister, a terrorism expert with the think tank Brookings Doha Center.

Some analysts view the split as having been prompted by Al Qaeda’s leadership fear that Al Baghdadi was too cruel with his beheadings, beatings and whippings and imposition of religious Shariah law on territory his men controlled.

But the dispute is, in some ways, more of a generational difference and a vying for the loyalty of jihadists affiliates and offshoots around the world – a jostling that is fracturing the jihadist movement and represents the biggest challenge Al Qaeda has faced since U.S. Navy SEALs took out bin Laden.

Many of the younger generation of jihadists support the Al Baghdadi idea of seizing territory and carving out a jihadist caliphate. They want their own state and have tired of Al Qaeda’s traditional approach of gradualism.

Caliphate refers to a system of government stretching across most of the Middle East and Turkey that ended nearly a century ago with the fall of the Ottomans.

And Al Baghdadi has been smart in his marketing – outshining Al Nusra in the use of social media to recruit and message.

“Taken globally, the younger generation of the jihadist community is becoming more and more supportive, largely out of fealty to its slick and proven capacity for attaining rapid results through brutality,” Lister said.

Al Baghdadi’s announcement of a caliphate in the summer straddling the border of Syria and Iraq – he has ambitions to spread it all the way west to Lebanon — has increased his standing among jihadi groups worldwide and more foreign fighters are choosing to join him than Al Nusra.

Several important affiliates have sworn allegiance to ISIS, while many others are avoiding declaring their choice between al Baghdadi or Al Qaeda, preferring to hedge their bets and wait to see who comes out on top.

On the ground in Syria and Iraq, the top dog at the moment is ISIS. With the advanced weaponry it has captured from fleeing Iraqi forces and the money it looted from Iraq’s regional banks, it has taken over the group and has much to offer recruits.

But Islamic State’s expansion has brought new battlefronts that could stretch the terror group to the breaking point. In Iraq, where it has carried out horrific executions of Christians and other religious minorities, it now faces hardened Kurdish fighters, the Iraqi Army, U.S. airstrikes and a budding international coalition and even Iran.

All that comes even as Islamic State, estimated to include less than 20,000 fighters, continues to seize villages and kill enemies in Syria. If the well-funded upstart terror group hopes to stay on top of the global jihad movement, it will have to maintain its momentum.

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/world/2014/08/29/fighting-in-syria-spawns-separate-civil-war-in-global-jihadist-movement/

ECONOMICS 101 College offers students $10G bachelor’s program

 

Experts estimate the average college graduate will leave school after four years carrying more than $30,000 in debt, a figure that prompted Southern New Hampshire University to offer a much different price point- a $10,000 Bachelor of Arts degree through the school’s new College for America.

The program, created as a partnership with employers, is designed specifically for working people, with real life experience who, for one reason or another, never got a college degree. The curriculum is competency based, self-paced and student work is submitted largely online.

“One thing we know that can move people from their socio-economic position to something better is an education and that’s the goal. We’re trying to get more Americans across that finish line,” said Paul LeBlanc, President of SNHU. “The hurdles for many people are that they have incredibly busy lives- so they’re juggling work and family and kids and soccer practice and church and whatever else that sort of informs their calendar.”

Some 70 corporate partners nationwide have signed on since the program launched in October of last year and 1,000 students have enrolled.

“I immediately thought it was brilliant,” said Lisa Guertin, president of Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New Hampshire. She says her company jumped at the chance to join the pilot program.

Instead of traditional lectures and course work, College for America aims to ensure a student can complete certain tasks and master skills related to key areas needed in the working world.

“An employer knows that when someone finishes the degree they will have demonstrated mastery in 120 very specific areas that are immediately applied to the job,” said Guertin. “So in terms of a corporate return on investment, I feel like it’s even stronger than just paying for general college courses, which we were already doing, so this was a bit of a no-brainer.”

“There are a lot of adults who know things. They don’t need to sit through sixteen weeks of college math if they’ve been the book keeper in their family company or if they’ve been doing this work for a long time,” said LeBlanc. “Our notion is let’s get you credit for what you know and let’s find you speedy ways for you to demonstrate your competency and move on.”

Darby Conley, a 36-year-old working mom, was among the first to enter the program through Anthem.

“I have three young children. I was pregnant at the time. I was allowed to be as aggressive as I needed to be and I was also able to take some time off to be with my newborn and sometimes it can seem not attainable when you’re looking at a two-year stretch or a four-year stretch,” said Conley who was drawn to the program’s low cost and flexability. “I was in control and I really got to dictate what my experience was going to be like.”

She has already earned her associate’s degree through the College for America and is now working toward her bachelor’s degree, achievements that have gave her a greater sense of confidence.

“Society can make you feel that if you don’t have that degree, if you don’t have that plaque that’s up on your wall, that you’re not worthy and I would say that I took that to heart,” said Conley. “I wouldn’t apply for a job because it would say degree required, bachelor’s required and I would be hesitant because I didn’t have that even though I knew I was strong and I’d proven myself so that checked box has empowered me.”

Molly Line joined Fox News Channel as a Boston-based correspondent in January 2006.

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/08/30/economics-degree-college-offers-10g-bachelor-program/

TEACHING FERGUSON Group’s lesson plan cites Black Panther platform

 

Even though the police shooting of an unarmed man in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is only weeks old and a grand jury is still trying sort out what really happened, a Washington-based nonprofit is offering a classroom lesson plan that draws a link between the incident and the revolutionary rhetoric of the 1960s Black Panther Party.

Teaching for Change says its “Teaching about Ferguson” guide can help students think critically about the shooting of Michael Brown in an Aug. 9 confrontation with police and ways they can be proactive in their own communities.

“The Black Panther Party’s 1966 platform, known as the 10-point program, included the demand: ‘We want an immediate end to police brutality and murder of Black people, other people of color, and all oppressed people inside the United States,’” the group’s Julian Hipkins III wrote.

“The issue of police brutality in communities of color has a long history and the Panther platform gives an example of how to turn grievances into a clear set of goals for meaningful change,” he said. The issue was first reported by education watchdog EAG News.

The shooting of Brown, 18, prompted several nights of angry protests near the spot where he was killed. Local police responded to those protests with tear gas, smoke canisters, and the use of surplus military equipment, including tanks. Some public officials and others called that response heavy-handed. Eventually, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon called in the National Guard to restore order.

Brown was buried Monday after hundreds attended his funeral at the Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church. A St. Louis County grand jury began reviewing evidence last week.

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch said it could take the grand jury until mid-October to hear all evidence.

“As the new school year begins, first and foremost on our minds and in our hearts will be the killing of Michael Brown,” Hipkins wrote. “Teachers may be faced with students’ anger, frustration, sadness, confusion, and questions. Some students will wonder how this could happen in the United States.”

Hipkins said his group’s lesson plan will introduce students to the history of the Black Panther movement and invite them to create their own list of demands. Huey Newton and other Panther leaders created the demands as the basis of the group’s radical, and sometimes violent, philosophy.

Hipkins and Teaching for Change included another topic for discussion in the lesson plan. It involved having students watch a video of Malcolm X accusing the United States of human rights violations against blacks and calling for a United Nations investigation.

“Indeed, the U.S. government is quick to condemn human rights violations in other countries, but does not expect to be accountable to the world for actions within its borders,” he wrote.

The lesson plan’s other areas of discussion include “History of Racism,” “Militarization of the Police” and “Student Fear and Resilience.”

Administrators for the public school system in Washington D.C. took a less controversial approach, distributing new guidance to teachers on how to talk about Ferguson in the classroom.

“While the facts of the case are still being sorted out by those in the criminal justice system, these events are teachable moments in classrooms across the District of Columbia Schools,” the school system said in a five-page teacher’s guide, “Preparing to Discuss Michael Brown in the Classroom.”

“If you are going to discuss the killing of Michael Brown, content questions might be: Who was Michael Brown? Where did he grow up? Why was he in Ferguson? These questions are important, but questions such as Why do you believe the police shot him? And how should communities react to this tragedy? Push students to make connections beyond one news story and lead to a more complex understanding of the situation,” DC Schools said.

While Washington schools weren’t shying away from the shooting, that wasn’t the case in Edwardsville, an Illinois school district 25 miles from Ferguson, . Teachers there were being told to avoid the subject altogether.

Superintended Ed Hightower told KMOX News that if students bring up the shooting in class, teachers have been told to change the subject.

Hightower told the station Ferguson wasn’t open for discussion because the shooting “has become a situation whereby there are so many facts that are unknown.”

Source Article from http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/08/30/ferguson-shooting-spurs-curriculum-advocates-to-craft-lesson-on-race/

Box Office: ‘As Above, So Below’ Digs Up $470,000 Thursday Night

Legendary Entertainment’s micro-budgeted horror film As Above, So Below, which dug up a so-so $470,000 on Thursday night in 1,805 theaters, looks to be headed to an opening day of about $3 million in North America, according to early estimates.

Friday’s one new wide release, playing in 2,640 locations, the horror film appears on track to earn between $8 million and $10 million for the Labor Day weekend. It follows a group of explorers that discover dark forces when they dive into the catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

The movie cost $5 million to make, minimizing Legendary’s risk, but both As Above, So Below and Relativity’s The November Man, the weekend’s other new offering which hit theaters Wednesday, are expected to have only modest performances over Labor Day weekend, which has never been a big movie-going holiday.    

Roger Donaldson‘s actioner The November Man, is going after the adult audience, and got an early jump by opening on Wednesday. But it was a slow start, opening in the No. 5 slot to just $862,000 at the North American box office. It’s Friday tally was shaping up as something between $2.5 and $3 million.

Released by Relativity Media (which acquired it for $3 million), the action film took in $833,000 on Thursday, and is aiming to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut.

The $20 million-plus movie, which follows an ex-CIA agent (Pierce Brosnan) who is brought back for one more mission and finds himself pitted against his former pupil, was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners. Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey also star.

Holdover Guardians of the Galaxy, which recently passed $500 million worldwide, is in a position to hang onto the weekend’s No. 1 spot, which it regained last weekend. The space adventure, which had grossed $258 million domestically as of Thursday, is  expected to take in another $16 million or so over the weekend. It also just crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office.

Aug. 29, 3:31 p.m. Revised with updated box office numbers.

Email: Rebecca.Ford@THR.com

Twitter: @Beccamford

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/U7PCJA-vnDo/story01.htm

Box Office: Pierce Brosnan’s ‘The November Man’ Opens to Soft No. 5

Roger Donaldson‘s adult-skewing espionage thriller The November Man, starring Pierce Brosnan in a role reminiscent of his James Bond days, opened to a soft $862,000 at the North American box office Wednesday for a fifth-place finish.

It’s true that adults don’t rush out to see a movie on opening night, but November Man had hoped to do more on its first day. The film, independently financed and released by Relativity Media, also stars Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey.

November Man stars Brosnan as an extremely dangerous ex-CIA agent who is lured out of retirement to protect a witness. The assignment makes him the target of his former friend and CIA protege.

Audiences liked November Man better than critics, giving it a B+ CinemaScore.

The film, getting an early jump on the long Labor Day holiday by opening Wednesday, hopes to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut, although it may only end up at $10 million, based on Wednesday’s number.

The $20 million-plus movie was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners, with Relativity acquiring U.S. rights for a reported $3 million.

The holiday’s second new nationwide player is Legendary Entertainment’s microbudgeted As Above, So Below, about a team of explorers who confront their past sins while caught in the twisting catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which begins rolling out Thursday night, per its deal with Legendary. The movie has targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

Labor Day is never a big moviegoing weekend, although this year could be even slower than usual. It’s likely that holdover Guardians of the Galaxy will stay at the No. 1 spot. The Disney and Marvel Studios title topped Wednesday’s chart with an estimated $1.5 million for a domestic total of $256.7 million.

Paramount’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles followed with an estimated $1.1 million for a domestic total of $149.6 million. YA film adaptation If I Stay came in No. 3 with an estimated $1 million for a total of $19.5 million, followed by R-rated comedy Let’s Be Cops with $800,000 for a total $48.3 million.

Despite gains made in August, thanks in large part to Guardians and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, domestic summer revenue is still down down nearly 15 percent from last year, and isn’t likely to get much past $4 billion by the end of Labor Day. That’s the lowest number in eight years.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/1JE9RH9YL5Q/story01.htm

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Crosses $500 Million Globally

Notching another victory, Marvel Studios and Disney’s Guardians of the Galaxy crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office Tuesday, only days after becoming the top film of the summer in North America.

Through Monday, the quirky superhero tentpole has earned $500.5 million, including $255.2 million domestically and $245.3 million internationally, where it has several key markets yet to open, including China, Japan, Germany and Italy.

And in the next few days, Guardians will eclipse Warner Bros. family hit The Lego Movie ($257.7 million) and fellow Marvel title Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($259.8 million) to become the top-grossing film of 2014 to date in North America.

Worldwide, Paramount and Michael Bay‘s Age of Extinction remains the year’s leader by far, with a global gross of $1.065 billion. Guardians ranks No. 10, just behind Godzilla ($508 million), which it will soon overtake.

From director James Gunn, Guardians of the Galaxy has pulled off the biggest box-office surprise of the year. Heading into summer, no one predicted that the movie would emerge the victor in North America. Opening Aug. 1, Guardians, praised for its originality, amazed with a record domestic debut and continued to impress from there.

Featuring a ragtag group of unlikely galactic heroes, Guardians stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee Pace and Bradley Cooper, who voices the role of Rocket Raccoon. Vin Diesel, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro also star.

Guardians wasn’t a cheap proposition and cost $170 million to produce. Marvel and Disney have already announced plans for a July 28, 2017 sequel, with Gunn returning to direct.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/qierRC4Y-BE/story01.htm

Box Office: ‘As Above, So Below’ Digs Up $470,000 Thursday Night

Legendary Entertainment’s micro-budgeted horror film As Above, So Below, which dug up a so-so $470,000 on Thursday night in 1,805 theaters, looks to be headed to an opening day of about $3 million in North America, according to early estimates.

Friday’s one new wide release, playing in 2,640 locations, the horror film appears on track to earn between $8 million and $10 million for the Labor Day weekend. It follows a group of explorers that discover dark forces when they dive into the catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

The movie cost $5 million to make, minimizing Legendary’s risk, but both As Above, So Below and Relativity’s The November Man, the weekend’s other new offering which hit theaters Wednesday, are expected to have only modest performances over Labor Day weekend, which has never been a big movie-going holiday.    

Roger Donaldson‘s actioner The November Man, is going after the adult audience, and got an early jump by opening on Wednesday. But it was a slow start, opening in the No. 5 slot to just $862,000 at the North American box office. It’s Friday tally was shaping up as something between $2.5 and $3 million.

Released by Relativity Media (which acquired it for $3 million), the action film took in $833,000 on Thursday, and is aiming to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut.

The $20 million-plus movie, which follows an ex-CIA agent (Pierce Brosnan) who is brought back for one more mission and finds himself pitted against his former pupil, was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners. Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey also star.

Holdover Guardians of the Galaxy, which recently passed $500 million worldwide, is in a position to hang onto the weekend’s No. 1 spot, which it regained last weekend. The space adventure, which had grossed $258 million domestically as of Thursday, is  expected to take in another $16 million or so over the weekend. It also just crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office.

Aug. 29, 3:31 p.m. Revised with updated box office numbers.

Email: Rebecca.Ford@THR.com

Twitter: @Beccamford

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/U7PCJA-vnDo/story01.htm

Box Office: Pierce Brosnan’s ‘The November Man’ Opens to Soft No. 5

Roger Donaldson‘s adult-skewing espionage thriller The November Man, starring Pierce Brosnan in a role reminiscent of his James Bond days, opened to a soft $862,000 at the North American box office Wednesday for a fifth-place finish.

It’s true that adults don’t rush out to see a movie on opening night, but November Man had hoped to do more on its first day. The film, independently financed and released by Relativity Media, also stars Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey.

November Man stars Brosnan as an extremely dangerous ex-CIA agent who is lured out of retirement to protect a witness. The assignment makes him the target of his former friend and CIA protege.

Audiences liked November Man better than critics, giving it a B+ CinemaScore.

The film, getting an early jump on the long Labor Day holiday by opening Wednesday, hopes to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut, although it may only end up at $10 million, based on Wednesday’s number.

The $20 million-plus movie was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners, with Relativity acquiring U.S. rights for a reported $3 million.

The holiday’s second new nationwide player is Legendary Entertainment’s microbudgeted As Above, So Below, about a team of explorers who confront their past sins while caught in the twisting catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which begins rolling out Thursday night, per its deal with Legendary. The movie has targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

Labor Day is never a big moviegoing weekend, although this year could be even slower than usual. It’s likely that holdover Guardians of the Galaxy will stay at the No. 1 spot. The Disney and Marvel Studios title topped Wednesday’s chart with an estimated $1.5 million for a domestic total of $256.7 million.

Paramount’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles followed with an estimated $1.1 million for a domestic total of $149.6 million. YA film adaptation If I Stay came in No. 3 with an estimated $1 million for a total of $19.5 million, followed by R-rated comedy Let’s Be Cops with $800,000 for a total $48.3 million.

Despite gains made in August, thanks in large part to Guardians and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, domestic summer revenue is still down down nearly 15 percent from last year, and isn’t likely to get much past $4 billion by the end of Labor Day. That’s the lowest number in eight years.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/1JE9RH9YL5Q/story01.htm

Box Office: ‘As Above, So Below’ Digs Up $470,000 Thursday Night

Legendary Entertainment’s micro-budgeted horror film As Above, So Below, which dug up a so-so $470,000 on Thursday night in 1,805 theaters, looks to be headed to an opening day of about $3 million in North America, according to early estimates.

Friday’s one new wide release, playing in 2,640 locations, the horror film appears on track to earn between $8 million and $10 million for the Labor Day weekend. It follows a group of explorers that discover dark forces when they dive into the catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

The movie cost $5 million to make, minimizing Legendary’s risk, but both As Above, So Below and Relativity’s The November Man, the weekend’s other new offering which hit theaters Wednesday, are expected to have only modest performances over Labor Day weekend, which has never been a big movie-going holiday.    

Roger Donaldson‘s actioner The November Man, is going after the adult audience, and got an early jump by opening on Wednesday. But it was a slow start, opening in the No. 5 slot to just $862,000 at the North American box office. It’s Friday tally was shaping up as something between $2.5 and $3 million.

Released by Relativity Media (which acquired it for $3 million), the action film took in $833,000 on Thursday, and is aiming to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut.

The $20 million-plus movie, which follows an ex-CIA agent (Pierce Brosnan) who is brought back for one more mission and finds himself pitted against his former pupil, was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners. Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey also star.

Holdover Guardians of the Galaxy, which recently passed $500 million worldwide, is in a position to hang onto the weekend’s No. 1 spot, which it regained last weekend. The space adventure, which had grossed $258 million domestically as of Thursday, is  expected to take in another $16 million or so over the weekend. It also just crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office.

Aug. 29, 3:31 p.m. Revised with updated box office numbers.

Email: Rebecca.Ford@THR.com

Twitter: @Beccamford

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/U7PCJA-vnDo/story01.htm

Box Office: ‘As Above, So Below’ Digs Up $470,000 Thursday Night

Legendary Entertainment’s micro-budgeted horror film As Above, So Below, which dug up a so-so $470,000 on Thursday night in 1,805 theaters, looks to be headed to an opening day of about $3 million in North America, according to early estimates.

Friday’s one new wide release, playing in 2,640 locations, the horror film appears on track to earn between $8 million and $10 million for the Labor Day weekend. It follows a group of explorers that discover dark forces when they dive into the catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

The movie cost $5 million to make, minimizing Legendary’s risk, but both As Above, So Below and Relativity’s The November Man, the weekend’s other new offering which hit theaters Wednesday, are expected to have only modest performances over Labor Day weekend, which has never been a big movie-going holiday.    

Roger Donaldson‘s actioner The November Man, is going after the adult audience, and got an early jump by opening on Wednesday. But it was a slow start, opening in the No. 5 slot to just $862,000 at the North American box office. It’s Friday tally was shaping up as something between $2.5 and $3 million.

Released by Relativity Media (which acquired it for $3 million), the action film took in $833,000 on Thursday, and is aiming to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut.

The $20 million-plus movie, which follows an ex-CIA agent (Pierce Brosnan) who is brought back for one more mission and finds himself pitted against his former pupil, was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners. Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey also star.

Holdover Guardians of the Galaxy, which recently passed $500 million worldwide, is in a position to hang onto the weekend’s No. 1 spot, which it regained last weekend. The space adventure, which had grossed $258 million domestically as of Thursday, is  expected to take in another $16 million or so over the weekend. It also just crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office.

Aug. 29, 3:31 p.m. Revised with updated box office numbers.

Email: Rebecca.Ford@THR.com

Twitter: @Beccamford

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/U7PCJA-vnDo/story01.htm

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Crosses $500 Million Globally

Notching another victory, Marvel Studios and Disney’s Guardians of the Galaxy crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office Tuesday, only days after becoming the top film of the summer in North America.

Through Monday, the quirky superhero tentpole has earned $500.5 million, including $255.2 million domestically and $245.3 million internationally, where it has several key markets yet to open, including China, Japan, Germany and Italy.

And in the next few days, Guardians will eclipse Warner Bros. family hit The Lego Movie ($257.7 million) and fellow Marvel title Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($259.8 million) to become the top-grossing film of 2014 to date in North America.

Worldwide, Paramount and Michael Bay‘s Age of Extinction remains the year’s leader by far, with a global gross of $1.065 billion. Guardians ranks No. 10, just behind Godzilla ($508 million), which it will soon overtake.

From director James Gunn, Guardians of the Galaxy has pulled off the biggest box-office surprise of the year. Heading into summer, no one predicted that the movie would emerge the victor in North America. Opening Aug. 1, Guardians, praised for its originality, amazed with a record domestic debut and continued to impress from there.

Featuring a ragtag group of unlikely galactic heroes, Guardians stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee Pace and Bradley Cooper, who voices the role of Rocket Raccoon. Vin Diesel, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro also star.

Guardians wasn’t a cheap proposition and cost $170 million to produce. Marvel and Disney have already announced plans for a July 28, 2017 sequel, with Gunn returning to direct.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/qierRC4Y-BE/story01.htm

Box Office: Pierce Brosnan’s ‘The November Man’ Opens to Soft No. 5

Roger Donaldson‘s adult-skewing espionage thriller The November Man, starring Pierce Brosnan in a role reminiscent of his James Bond days, opened to a soft $862,000 at the North American box office Wednesday for a fifth-place finish.

It’s true that adults don’t rush out to see a movie on opening night, but November Man had hoped to do more on its first day. The film, independently financed and released by Relativity Media, also stars Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey.

November Man stars Brosnan as an extremely dangerous ex-CIA agent who is lured out of retirement to protect a witness. The assignment makes him the target of his former friend and CIA protege.

Audiences liked November Man better than critics, giving it a B+ CinemaScore.

The film, getting an early jump on the long Labor Day holiday by opening Wednesday, hopes to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut, although it may only end up at $10 million, based on Wednesday’s number.

The $20 million-plus movie was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners, with Relativity acquiring U.S. rights for a reported $3 million.

The holiday’s second new nationwide player is Legendary Entertainment’s microbudgeted As Above, So Below, about a team of explorers who confront their past sins while caught in the twisting catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which begins rolling out Thursday night, per its deal with Legendary. The movie has targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

Labor Day is never a big moviegoing weekend, although this year could be even slower than usual. It’s likely that holdover Guardians of the Galaxy will stay at the No. 1 spot. The Disney and Marvel Studios title topped Wednesday’s chart with an estimated $1.5 million for a domestic total of $256.7 million.

Paramount’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles followed with an estimated $1.1 million for a domestic total of $149.6 million. YA film adaptation If I Stay came in No. 3 with an estimated $1 million for a total of $19.5 million, followed by R-rated comedy Let’s Be Cops with $800,000 for a total $48.3 million.

Despite gains made in August, thanks in large part to Guardians and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, domestic summer revenue is still down down nearly 15 percent from last year, and isn’t likely to get much past $4 billion by the end of Labor Day. That’s the lowest number in eight years.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/1JE9RH9YL5Q/story01.htm

Box Office: Pierce Brosnan’s ‘The November Man’ Opens to Soft No. 5

Roger Donaldson‘s adult-skewing espionage thriller The November Man, starring Pierce Brosnan in a role reminiscent of his James Bond days, opened to a soft $862,000 at the North American box office Wednesday for a fifth-place finish.

It’s true that adults don’t rush out to see a movie on opening night, but November Man had hoped to do more on its first day. The film, independently financed and released by Relativity Media, also stars Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey.

November Man stars Brosnan as an extremely dangerous ex-CIA agent who is lured out of retirement to protect a witness. The assignment makes him the target of his former friend and CIA protege.

Audiences liked November Man better than critics, giving it a B+ CinemaScore.

The film, getting an early jump on the long Labor Day holiday by opening Wednesday, hopes to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut, although it may only end up at $10 million, based on Wednesday’s number.

The $20 million-plus movie was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners, with Relativity acquiring U.S. rights for a reported $3 million.

The holiday’s second new nationwide player is Legendary Entertainment’s microbudgeted As Above, So Below, about a team of explorers who confront their past sins while caught in the twisting catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which begins rolling out Thursday night, per its deal with Legendary. The movie has targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

Labor Day is never a big moviegoing weekend, although this year could be even slower than usual. It’s likely that holdover Guardians of the Galaxy will stay at the No. 1 spot. The Disney and Marvel Studios title topped Wednesday’s chart with an estimated $1.5 million for a domestic total of $256.7 million.

Paramount’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles followed with an estimated $1.1 million for a domestic total of $149.6 million. YA film adaptation If I Stay came in No. 3 with an estimated $1 million for a total of $19.5 million, followed by R-rated comedy Let’s Be Cops with $800,000 for a total $48.3 million.

Despite gains made in August, thanks in large part to Guardians and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, domestic summer revenue is still down down nearly 15 percent from last year, and isn’t likely to get much past $4 billion by the end of Labor Day. That’s the lowest number in eight years.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/1JE9RH9YL5Q/story01.htm

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Crosses $500 Million Globally

Notching another victory, Marvel Studios and Disney’s Guardians of the Galaxy crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office Tuesday, only days after becoming the top film of the summer in North America.

Through Monday, the quirky superhero tentpole has earned $500.5 million, including $255.2 million domestically and $245.3 million internationally, where it has several key markets yet to open, including China, Japan, Germany and Italy.

And in the next few days, Guardians will eclipse Warner Bros. family hit The Lego Movie ($257.7 million) and fellow Marvel title Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($259.8 million) to become the top-grossing film of 2014 to date in North America.

Worldwide, Paramount and Michael Bay‘s Age of Extinction remains the year’s leader by far, with a global gross of $1.065 billion. Guardians ranks No. 10, just behind Godzilla ($508 million), which it will soon overtake.

From director James Gunn, Guardians of the Galaxy has pulled off the biggest box-office surprise of the year. Heading into summer, no one predicted that the movie would emerge the victor in North America. Opening Aug. 1, Guardians, praised for its originality, amazed with a record domestic debut and continued to impress from there.

Featuring a ragtag group of unlikely galactic heroes, Guardians stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee Pace and Bradley Cooper, who voices the role of Rocket Raccoon. Vin Diesel, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro also star.

Guardians wasn’t a cheap proposition and cost $170 million to produce. Marvel and Disney have already announced plans for a July 28, 2017 sequel, with Gunn returning to direct.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/qierRC4Y-BE/story01.htm

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Crosses $500 Million Globally

Notching another victory, Marvel Studios and Disney’s Guardians of the Galaxy crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office Tuesday, only days after becoming the top film of the summer in North America.

Through Monday, the quirky superhero tentpole has earned $500.5 million, including $255.2 million domestically and $245.3 million internationally, where it has several key markets yet to open, including China, Japan, Germany and Italy.

And in the next few days, Guardians will eclipse Warner Bros. family hit The Lego Movie ($257.7 million) and fellow Marvel title Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($259.8 million) to become the top-grossing film of 2014 to date in North America.

Worldwide, Paramount and Michael Bay‘s Age of Extinction remains the year’s leader by far, with a global gross of $1.065 billion. Guardians ranks No. 10, just behind Godzilla ($508 million), which it will soon overtake.

From director James Gunn, Guardians of the Galaxy has pulled off the biggest box-office surprise of the year. Heading into summer, no one predicted that the movie would emerge the victor in North America. Opening Aug. 1, Guardians, praised for its originality, amazed with a record domestic debut and continued to impress from there.

Featuring a ragtag group of unlikely galactic heroes, Guardians stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee Pace and Bradley Cooper, who voices the role of Rocket Raccoon. Vin Diesel, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro also star.

Guardians wasn’t a cheap proposition and cost $170 million to produce. Marvel and Disney have already announced plans for a July 28, 2017 sequel, with Gunn returning to direct.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/qierRC4Y-BE/story01.htm

Box Office: ‘As Above, So Below’ Digs Up $470,000 Thursday Night

Legendary Entertainment’s micro-budgeted horror film As Above, So Below, which dug up a so-so $470,000 on Thursday night in 1,805 theaters, looks to be headed to an opening day of about $3 million in North America, according to early estimates.

Friday’s one new wide release, playing in 2,640 locations, the horror film appears on track to earn between $8 million and $10 million for the Labor Day weekend. It follows a group of explorers that discover dark forces when they dive into the catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

The movie cost $5 million to make, minimizing Legendary’s risk, but both As Above, So Below and Relativity’s The November Man, the weekend’s other new offering which hit theaters Wednesday, are expected to have only modest performances over Labor Day weekend, which has never been a big movie-going holiday.    

Roger Donaldson‘s actioner The November Man, is going after the adult audience, and got an early jump by opening on Wednesday. But it was a slow start, opening in the No. 5 slot to just $862,000 at the North American box office. It’s Friday tally was shaping up as something between $2.5 and $3 million.

Released by Relativity Media (which acquired it for $3 million), the action film took in $833,000 on Thursday, and is aiming to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut.

The $20 million-plus movie, which follows an ex-CIA agent (Pierce Brosnan) who is brought back for one more mission and finds himself pitted against his former pupil, was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners. Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey also star.

Holdover Guardians of the Galaxy, which recently passed $500 million worldwide, is in a position to hang onto the weekend’s No. 1 spot, which it regained last weekend. The space adventure, which had grossed $258 million domestically as of Thursday, is  expected to take in another $16 million or so over the weekend. It also just crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office.

Aug. 29, 3:31 p.m. Revised with updated box office numbers.

Email: Rebecca.Ford@THR.com

Twitter: @Beccamford

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/U7PCJA-vnDo/story01.htm

Box Office: Pierce Brosnan’s ‘The November Man’ Opens to Soft No. 5

Roger Donaldson‘s adult-skewing espionage thriller The November Man, starring Pierce Brosnan in a role reminiscent of his James Bond days, opened to a soft $862,000 at the North American box office Wednesday for a fifth-place finish.

It’s true that adults don’t rush out to see a movie on opening night, but November Man had hoped to do more on its first day. The film, independently financed and released by Relativity Media, also stars Olga Kurylenko and Luke Bracey.

November Man stars Brosnan as an extremely dangerous ex-CIA agent who is lured out of retirement to protect a witness. The assignment makes him the target of his former friend and CIA protege.

Audiences liked November Man better than critics, giving it a B+ CinemaScore.

The film, getting an early jump on the long Labor Day holiday by opening Wednesday, hopes to earn $9 million to $12 million over the course of its six-day debut, although it may only end up at $10 million, based on Wednesday’s number.

The $20 million-plus movie was made by The Solution Entertainment Group, Palmstar Media Capital and Merced Media Partners, with Relativity acquiring U.S. rights for a reported $3 million.

The holiday’s second new nationwide player is Legendary Entertainment’s microbudgeted As Above, So Below, about a team of explorers who confront their past sins while caught in the twisting catacombs that lie beneath the streets of Paris. Universal is releasing the film, which begins rolling out Thursday night, per its deal with Legendary. The movie has targeted younger consumers with an aggressive digital campaign.

Labor Day is never a big moviegoing weekend, although this year could be even slower than usual. It’s likely that holdover Guardians of the Galaxy will stay at the No. 1 spot. The Disney and Marvel Studios title topped Wednesday’s chart with an estimated $1.5 million for a domestic total of $256.7 million.

Paramount’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles followed with an estimated $1.1 million for a domestic total of $149.6 million. YA film adaptation If I Stay came in No. 3 with an estimated $1 million for a total of $19.5 million, followed by R-rated comedy Let’s Be Cops with $800,000 for a total $48.3 million.

Despite gains made in August, thanks in large part to Guardians and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, domestic summer revenue is still down down nearly 15 percent from last year, and isn’t likely to get much past $4 billion by the end of Labor Day. That’s the lowest number in eight years.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/1JE9RH9YL5Q/story01.htm

Box-Office Milestone: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Crosses $500 Million Globally

Notching another victory, Marvel Studios and Disney’s Guardians of the Galaxy crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office Tuesday, only days after becoming the top film of the summer in North America.

Through Monday, the quirky superhero tentpole has earned $500.5 million, including $255.2 million domestically and $245.3 million internationally, where it has several key markets yet to open, including China, Japan, Germany and Italy.

And in the next few days, Guardians will eclipse Warner Bros. family hit The Lego Movie ($257.7 million) and fellow Marvel title Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($259.8 million) to become the top-grossing film of 2014 to date in North America.

Worldwide, Paramount and Michael Bay‘s Age of Extinction remains the year’s leader by far, with a global gross of $1.065 billion. Guardians ranks No. 10, just behind Godzilla ($508 million), which it will soon overtake.

From director James Gunn, Guardians of the Galaxy has pulled off the biggest box-office surprise of the year. Heading into summer, no one predicted that the movie would emerge the victor in North America. Opening Aug. 1, Guardians, praised for its originality, amazed with a record domestic debut and continued to impress from there.

Featuring a ragtag group of unlikely galactic heroes, Guardians stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Lee Pace and Bradley Cooper, who voices the role of Rocket Raccoon. Vin Diesel, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro also star.

Guardians wasn’t a cheap proposition and cost $170 million to produce. Marvel and Disney have already announced plans for a July 28, 2017 sequel, with Gunn returning to direct.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/boxoffice/~3/qierRC4Y-BE/story01.htm

Why the U.S. avoids calling Russia’s actions in Ukraine an ‘invasion’

U.S. President Barack Obama chose his words carefully when asked whether Russia’s recent actions in Ukraine should be considered an invasion, an indication of how the White House continues to judiciously avoid the use of that particular word fearing its geo-political ramifications.


“I consider the actions that we’ve seen in the last week a continuation of what’s been taking place for months now,” Obama told reporters.


Minutes before, the president had referred to the situation as “this ongoing Russian incursion” into Ukraine that will “only bring more costs and consequences for Russia.”


‘Discussion of terminology’


In an interview on Thursday with MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell, State Department official Jen Psaki was pressed on the point: “If there’s artillery firing across the border and tanks moving and movements of soldiers, what’s the difference between an incursion and an invasion?”


I think this is a discussion about terminology” Psaki responded, adding that “what we’ve seen here is an escalation of aggression by the Russians, a pattern, actually, over the last several months.”


Psaki was also pressed on the issue by reporters asking why the White House refused to use the term and that Ukraine itself was calling it an invasion.


However, the State Department official remained on message: “I think our focus is more on what Russia is doing, what we’re going to do about it than what we’re calling it,” Psaki said.


Obama

U.S. President Barack Obama has ruled out military intervention in the ongoing Ukraine crisis. (Charles Dharapak/Associated Press)


The diplomatic tiptoeing around the word comes as pro-Russian rebels suddenly opened a new front and pushed Ukrainian troops out of a key town in strategic coastal territory along the Sea of Azov. Kyiv and Western countries say the reversal was the result of the arrival of armoured columns of Russian troops, sent by Putin to prop up a rebellion that would otherwise have been near collapse.


Other Western leaders have also avoided use of the “invasion” word, except Canada, which continues to employ tough rhetoric against Moscow.


But for the U.S. and other Western countries, careful language is not surprising, particularly with politically loaded words like invasion, which can spark historical comparisons to Hitler’s invasion of Poland or Saddam’s invasion of Kuwait.


Obligated to find a cure


The more you hype it, the more you diagnose the severity of the illness, the more you’re obligated, either morally, politically or practically, to find a cure,” said Aaron David Miller, a foreign policy expert and scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars


“And there’s a certain reality here. There’s a tendency on the part of this administration to allow its rhetoric to exceed its capacity to deliver,” Miller said “We’re not going to be able blunt or stop Putin’s objectives in eastern Ukraine any more than we could stop the aggrandizement of Crimea.”


Elliott Abrams, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, said officials avoid using the word for the same reason the U.S. wouldn’t call Egypt’s military ouster of former president Mohammed Morsi a coup or why some mass slaughters aren’t referred to as genocide. 


“Some words have both legal and emotional effects. And in the case of invasion, it’s emotional and political,” Abrams said.


“I think they don’t want to use the word invasion because it makes harder the next question: And what are you going to do about it?”


Obama and his Western allies have so far ruled out any kind of military intervention in the ongoing crisis, instead seeking to increase economic sanctions to punish Russia. Calling the crisis an invasion would raise expectations that a response to that invasion will be be robust “when the chances are that the Western response will be anything but robust,” said Randall Hansen, director of the University of Toronto’s Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.


Meanwhile,Canada isn’t subject to the same expectations of military action, allowing its officials to be more bold, Hansen said.


“It’s partly the freedom of not mattering,” said Hansen. “The Canadian government can shout and scream as much as it likes knowing that it doesn’t really have to do anything. In contrast, Obama and [German Chancellor Angela] Merkel have to measure every word because the entire world is hanging on them and have a level of responsibility that neither Harper or Baird has or will have.”












Source Article from http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/ukraine-crisis-why-the-u-s-avoids-calling-russia-s-actions-an-invasion-1.2750469?cmp=rss

Why the U.S. avoids calling Russia’s actions in Ukraine an ‘invasion’

U.S. President Barack Obama chose his words carefully when asked whether Russia’s recent actions in Ukraine should be considered an invasion, an indication of how the White House continues to judiciously avoid the use of that particular word fearing its geo-political ramifications.


“I consider the actions that we’ve seen in the last week a continuation of what’s been taking place for months now,” Obama told reporters.


Minutes before, the president had referred to the situation as “this ongoing Russian incursion” into Ukraine that will “only bring more costs and consequences for Russia.”


‘Discussion of terminology’


In an interview on Thursday with MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell, State Department official Jen Psaki was pressed on the point: “If there’s artillery firing across the border and tanks moving and movements of soldiers, what’s the difference between an incursion and an invasion?”


I think this is a discussion about terminology” Psaki responded, adding that “what we’ve seen here is an escalation of aggression by the Russians, a pattern, actually, over the last several months.”


Psaki was also pressed on the issue by reporters asking why the White House refused to use the term and that Ukraine itself was calling it an invasion.


However, the State Department official remained on message: “I think our focus is more on what Russia is doing, what we’re going to do about it than what we’re calling it,” Psaki said.


Obama

U.S. President Barack Obama has ruled out military intervention in the ongoing Ukraine crisis. (Charles Dharapak/Associated Press)


The diplomatic tiptoeing around the word comes as pro-Russian rebels suddenly opened a new front and pushed Ukrainian troops out of a key town in strategic coastal territory along the Sea of Azov. Kyiv and Western countries say the reversal was the result of the arrival of armoured columns of Russian troops, sent by Putin to prop up a rebellion that would otherwise have been near collapse.


Other Western leaders have also avoided use of the “invasion” word, except Canada, which continues to employ tough rhetoric against Moscow.


But for the U.S. and other Western countries, careful language is not surprising, particularly with politically loaded words like invasion, which can spark historical comparisons to Hitler’s invasion of Poland or Saddam’s invasion of Kuwait.


Obligated to find a cure


The more you hype it, the more you diagnose the severity of the illness, the more you’re obligated, either morally, politically or practically, to find a cure,” said Aaron David Miller, a foreign policy expert and scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars


“And there’s a certain reality here. There’s a tendency on the part of this administration to allow its rhetoric to exceed its capacity to deliver,” Miller said “We’re not going to be able blunt or stop Putin’s objectives in eastern Ukraine any more than we could stop the aggrandizement of Crimea.”


Elliott Abrams, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, said officials avoid using the word for the same reason the U.S. wouldn’t call Egypt’s military ouster of former president Mohammed Morsi a coup or why some mass slaughters aren’t referred to as genocide. 


“Some words have both legal and emotional effects. And in the case of invasion, it’s emotional and political,” Abrams said.


“I think they don’t want to use the word invasion because it makes harder the next question: And what are you going to do about it?”


Obama and his Western allies have so far ruled out any kind of military intervention in the ongoing crisis, instead seeking to increase economic sanctions to punish Russia. Calling the crisis an invasion would raise expectations that a response to that invasion will be be robust “when the chances are that the Western response will be anything but robust,” said Randall Hansen, director of the University of Toronto’s Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.


Meanwhile,Canada isn’t subject to the same expectations of military action, allowing its officials to be more bold, Hansen said.


“It’s partly the freedom of not mattering,” said Hansen. “The Canadian government can shout and scream as much as it likes knowing that it doesn’t really have to do anything. In contrast, Obama and [German Chancellor Angela] Merkel have to measure every word because the entire world is hanging on them and have a level of responsibility that neither Harper or Baird has or will have.”












Source Article from http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/ukraine-crisis-why-the-u-s-avoids-calling-russia-s-actions-an-invasion-1.2750469?cmp=rss

Zero-giving teacher’s firing gets failing grade on appeal

A provincial appeal board that looks into the firing of teachers has found the Edmonton Public School Board “did not act fairly” when they suspended and then fired Lynden Dorval, who broke school policy by giving zeros to his students.


“Sometimes standing up for something has an effect. It actually works,” Dorval said Friday. “It was just something that was the right thing to do.”


Dorval, a physics teacher at Ross Sheppard High School, was suspended in May 2012 for awarding zeros for work that wasn’t handed in or tests not taken, which went against the school’s policy.


Four months later, Dorval received a notice that he had been fired. He appealed the dismissal to the Board of Reference, which found earlier this month that he “was treated unfairly in his dismissal.”


“This board finds no evidence of deliberate misconduct by the teacher, and certainly no evidence of deliberate repeated misconduct,” the decision states.


The board ordered a full repayment of pay from the date of dismissal as well as a top-up of his pension.


Dorval is now retired, so the board did not order that he be reinstated.


The board also found Dorval’s original suspension in May was not justified and that he “was not permitted full opportunity” to respond to the allegations.


“The basis for the suspension appeared to be that the principal viewed any form of dissent as insubordination which was not to be tolerated, despite repeated efforts by teachers to explain why the directive interfered with their professional judgment and could result in illegitimate outcomes,” the decision reads.


Edmonton Public School Board spokeswoman Lisa Austin said the ruling was disappointing and that the board would appeal.


She says the board made the decision after getting an opinion from outside legal counsel.


“They informed us that there was several grounds upon which we could appeal the decision,” she said.


The school board has 30 days to file the appeal.


Source Article from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/lynden-dorval-fired-for-giving-zeros-treated-unfairly-appeal-board-rules-1.2751007?cmp=rss

Gaza reconstruction could take 20 years, UN-backed construction authority says

An international organization involved in assessing post-conflict reconstruction says it will take 20 years for Gaza’s battered and neglected housing stock to be rebuilt following the war between Hamas and Israel.


The assessment by Shelter Cluster, co-chaired by the UN refugee agency and the Red Cross, underscores the complexities involved in an overall reconstruction program for the Gaza Strip, which some Palestinian officials have estimated could cost in excess of $6 billion.

MIDEAST-GAZA/

Palestinians gather around the remains of a tower building housing offices which was destroyed by an Israeli air strike in Gaza City before the current ceasefire went into effect. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)


Any effort to rebuild Gaza will be hindered by a blockade imposed by Egypt and Israel since the Islamic militant group Hamas seized power in 2007. Israel has severely restricted the import of concrete and other building materials into Gaza, fearing that militants will use them to build rockets and reinforce cross-border attack tunnels.


Egypt and Norway have raised the possibility of convening a Gaza donors’ conference at some point next month, but no firm arrangements have been made.


17,000 homes destroyed


With a population of 1.8 million, Gaza is a densely populated coastal strip of urban warrens and agricultural land that still bears the scars of previous rounds of fighting.


In its report issued late Friday, Shelter Cluster said 17,000 Gaza housing units were destroyed or severely damaged during this summer’s war and 5,000 units still need work after damage sustained in the previous military campaigns. In addition, it says, Gaza has a housing deficit of 75,000 units.


Gaza conflict reconstruction

Palestinian officials have estimated that reconstruction efforts in Gaza may cost upward of $6 billion. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)


Shelter Cluster said its 20-year assessment is based on the capacity of the main Israel-Gaza cargo crossing to handle 100 trucks of construction materials daily.


The latest war began after three Israeli teens were killed in the West Bank by Hamas operatives in June, prompting Israel to arrest hundreds of Hamas members there. Rocket fire from Gaza on Israeli cities then escalated, and Israel launched a massive air and later ground campaign. The fighting lasted almost two months.


Egyptian mediators tried early on to get the sides to agree to a cease-fire. Several temporary truces were broken by Gaza militants.


Over 2,100 Palestinians, most civilians, died in the war. Israel lost 71 people, all but six of them soldiers.












Source Article from http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/gaza-reconstruction-will-take-20-years-un-backed-construction-authority-says-1.2751313?cmp=rss

Asylum detention like Russia: Pussy Riot



MEMBERS of feminist punk band Pussy Riot have likened Australia’s treatment of asylum seekers to the condition of Russian prisoners.


MASHA Alyokhina and Nadya Tolokonnikova drew the parallels during their panel discussion at Sydney’s Festival of Dangerous Ideas, the Guardian reports.

“We were surprised by the problems here, such as detention camps, which are similar to what is happening in Russia,” Tolokonnikova told an audience in Sydney. The pair responded to calls for them to boycott the festival over links between its co-organisers at the St James Ethics Centre and the federal government’s asylum seeker strategy. Instead of refusing to attend, speaking at the Sydney Opera House festival would hopefully bring attention to the topic, they said. The members also called on Australia to withdraw its invitation to President Vladimir Putin to attend this year’s G20 summit.
“We think that this person has no place at the G20,” Alyokhina said. When Prime Minister Tony Abbott addressed calls for Putin to be excluded from the G20 on Friday, he said it was weighing on his mind. “It’s not a decision which Australia really has a right to make unilaterally,” he told reporters. Both Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova spent 22 months in jail after staging a protest performance in a Moscow cathedral in 2012. But the women said the situation in Russia was so repressive they would not be able to repeat their cathedral performance. Since their imprisonment, the women have campaigned to defend the rights of prisoners.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/newscomaunationalbreakingnewsndm/~3/uhooGNeSsNg/story01.htm